Germany, Hamburg 

Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall

Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall Airbus A380 Interior Equipment Assembly Hall       
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Design Volkwin Marg with Marc Ziemons

Partner Nikolaus Goetze

Project manager Kai Ritzke

Design team Karen Seekamp, Dirk Balser, Thomas Schuster

Project team Torsten Hinz, Sylke Hoffmann, Gabi Wysocki, Martin Marschner, Rüdiger Wobst, Christiane Fickers, Heiko Thiess, Marcus Tanzen, Peter Karn, Jochen Schwarz, Moritz Hoffmann-Becking, Holger Wermers

Structural engineers Binnewies, Hamburg; Schlaich Bergermann und Partner, Stuttgart

Technical building equipment Heinze Stockfisch Grabis + Partner, Hamburg

Light planning Peter Andres Lichtplanung, Hamburg

Client Airbus Deutschland GmbH, Hamburg

Construction period 2003–2005

Gross area 58,890 m²

 

Photographers:

Heiner Leiska

www.leiska.de

The extension of the Hamburg Airbus plant continues with the construction of the Equipment Assembly Hall to the north following the completion of the Major Component Assembly Hall. Its design reflects the entry awarded first prize for the A380-Production Halls in November 2000.

The Equipment Assembly Hall consists of four free standing interconnected assembly spaces, each with a width of 92.5 metres and a depth of more than 80 metres. An enormous administration building to the south accommodates office space. The nose of the Airbus “breaks through” this massive structure and is reflected by projections in the façade, the so-called nose scoops.

Four tail scoops located on the hall’s roof provide the necessary height clearance. The external load bearing structure extends over the entire length of the hall as a ten meter high framework girder, supported by five main supports. Eight transverse framework girders with a height of nine metres rest on supports next to nose projections, cross the main support with a rigid connection and freely project 36 meters next to the tail scoops out over the north façade.

The entire length of the 370 meter-long glazed north façade is open to the Elbe River and its banks. In the daytime the lighting conditions of the sky are reflected in the glass, while at night the anti-glare interior and exterior lighting causes the halls to shimmer and provides a view of the airplanes in the distance.