Bistro Table, round & square

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Bistro Table, Round with a 90cm diameter
Design Meinhard von Gerkan
Co-worker Volkmar Sievers
Year 2003
Construction inserted joint system to be assembled
Material light-brown birch veneer plywood, 40mm, tabletop ends stained black, brushed stainless steel pole plate.

 

Bistro Table, square with edge length of 90cm
Design Meinhard von Gerkan
Co-worker Volkmar Sievers
Construction inserted joint system to be assembled, table-top divided into four triangles
Material light-brown birch veneer plywood, 40 mm, brushed stainless steel frame with round post and T-section cross frame

 

Photographers:

Heiner Leiska

www.leiska.de

Bistro Table, round
According to the non-documented anecdote, the Russian warriors occupying Paris in the early 19th century, wanted to be served prohibited hard liquor as quickly as possible, so they would not be caught. Consequently the Russian term for quick "bistro" became the name for a certain type of tavern: cosy, with a small menu, not at all "stylish", however very, very French (including “toujour l‘amour”). These days, the service is actually no longer fast. A table for a bistro has to express all that: Instead of the usual four people, the table has to provide space for five, six or eight, as one meets friends in the bistro. It also has to endure the treatment of a dear friend and should therefore be durable. When it can also be disassembled, thus allowing an adaptable number of spaces, it fulfils all requirements: Vive la table!


Bistro Table, square
Who has not gone through this before?: "Take the Allen key A and put it through the slot B by inserting the top X into the leg Y!" Frequently the result questions one's own technical intelligence and brings about bizarre structures which do not at all resemble the table or chair that seemed so convincing in the shop. The actual task for the designer is therefore not to find a powerfully eloquent translator for Swedish construction manuals, but to develop an item that needs no translation. Two steel trestles crosswise inserted into each other; no screw, no Allen key, no stress. Wooden board quarters are put on top in the only possible fashion - voilà!
Should the table not be needed any longer, it retreats to a modest and flat position at the edge.